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Pediatric EyeCare

Good vision doesn’t just happen. A child’s brain learns how to use eyes to see, just like it learns how to use legs to walk or a mouth to form words. The longer a vision problem goes undiagnosed and untreated, the greater the potential for permanent vision loss.

That’s why a comprehensive eye examination is critically important for children. Early detection and treatment provide the very best opportunity to correct vision problems.  Make sure your child has the best possible tools to learn successfully.

Dr. Ramsey recommends eye exams for children in accordance with the American Optometric Association guidelines:

  Asymptomatic/Risk Free At Risk
Birth to 24 Months At 6 months of age By 6 months of age or as recommended
2 to 5 years At 3 years of age At 3 years of age or as recommended
6 to 18 years Before first grade and every two years thereafter Annually or as recommended

Factors placing an infant, toddler, or child at significant risk for visual impairment include:

  • Prematurity, low birth weight, oxygen at birth, grade III or IV intraventricular hemorrhage
  • Family history of retinoblastoma, congenital cataracts, or metabolic or genetic disease
  • Infection of mother during pregnancy (e.g., rubella, toxoplasmosis, venereal disease, herpes, cytomegalovirus, or AIDS)
  • Difficult or assisted labor, which may be associated with fetal distress or low Apgar scores
  • High refractive error
  • Strabismus
  • Anisometropia
  • Known or suspected central nervous system dysfunction evidenced by developmental delay, cerebral palsy, dysmorphic features, seizures, or hydrocephalus

Children with uncorrected vision conditions or eye health problems face many barriers in life … academically … socially … and athletically. High-quality eye care can break down these barriers and help enable your children to reach their highest potential.

(Source: AOA.org)